Posted in Non-Fiction

Charles Bukowski: Post Office

Right, my last three reviews have encompassed a lot of serious philosophising and whatnot. Charles Bukowski’s Post Office (1971) isn’t quite in the same league there, but what it does represent is a fine instalment in addiction, and down and out, literature, as well as something genuinely funny to read.

The former sprung forth through the likes of Thomas De Quincey in the 19th century, who candidly discussed his addiction to opium. The latter, down and out literature, I first came across when I read several of George Orwell’s works, which dealt with poverty and social and economic injustice – a sad situation which hasn’t advanced a great deal since Orwell’s day.

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Posted in Fiction

Jean-Paul Sartre: Iron in the Soul

Sartre’s Roads to Freedom trilogy ends here, in an epic novel which advances the story of Mathieu Delarue on his quest for personal freedom. The Age of Reason and the Reprieve, over 600 pages, develop his character considerably, from a bumbling university professor to a man on the brink of war, before, finally, being thrown into battle for Iron in the Soul (also known as Troubled Sleep – for this review, I’ll stick with its original translation).

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Posted in Fiction

Jean-Paul Sartre: The Age of Reason

With its existential themes and mission to examine and expose the nature of personal autonomy, Sartre’s epic Roads to Freedom trilogy was completed in a mighty flurry of activity, with the Age of Reason published in September 1945 shortly after the Nazi occupation of France and World War II ended.

It was joined immediately by the Reprieve, the writing style of which uses simultaneity as events unfold at the same time, with Sartre considering numerous characters at once as they jostle for position on page.

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Posted in Non-Fiction

Gerald Durrell: My Family and Other Animals

After the hedonism, madness, and squalor of the first two Moonshake Book reviews, this time out I’m having a detailed look at a delightful classic.

I first read My Family and Other Animals in the summer of 2005. University had ended for the second year and there were two months of peace and quiet before the onslaught of the third year began – I used this time to opportunistically cram in a few extra novels. Not as part of my English course (which, over three years, offered little of interest for me – Beowulf, anyone?), but more as a means to discover new writers.

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Posted in Classical Music

10 Absolutely Glorious Classical Music Animations – Bring Your Reading to Life!

Okay, my third literature post on here will be this weekend, but in the meantime I figured it’d be a glorious opportunity to put a bit of other-worldly genius music on the blog. This being the internet, the music had to be accompanied by some serious creative brilliance, so there really was only one place to turn.

Stephen Malinowski offers one of the finest YouTube channels out there – his videos (made using the Music Animation Machine) really are a modern marvel. He’s been making these educational animations since the early 1990s and received press interest in America back then, but with the advent of the internet and the arrival of YouTube, the popularity of his animations skyrocketed.

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Posted in Non-Fiction

Venedikt Yerofeyev: Moscow Stations

Welcome to the wild, unhinged, mental, and quite brilliant world of Venedikt Yerofeyev’s Moscow Stations.

The Russian writer (whose surname is also written as Erofeyev, Yerofeev, and Erofeev – there seems to be a tremendous amount of confusion about this) penned it in 1969, but it was first published 20 years later as a warning to the population about heavy drinking.

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Posted in Non-Fiction

George Orwell: Down and Out in Paris and London

For the first Moonshake Books post, I’m covering Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell. This was a vital text for me as I first read it when I was 17 and, emerging from childhood and teenage years reading Brian Jacques’ wonderful Redwall series, it introduced me to an exciting and grown-up literary world.

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